How To Increase Bat Speed

Every hitter wants to know how to increase bat speed. We have the secret below. Bat speed is a crucial element in hitting for distance. In fact, velocity is arguably the most important factor in home run science. When in the load position, a batter’s arms and shoulders are packed with potential energy that is converted to kinetic energy as the swing progresses. Kinetic energy is energy that results from an object’s motion. Think of a coiled spring – a stretched spring has potential energy and releasing it involves kinetic energy. Because of this coiled tension, hitting the ball later in the swing results in an increase in bat speed at the moment of contact. This brings us back to why learning how to increase bat speed is so important in hitting for distance.

Since the resistance is added inside the kinetic chain and not an external modality like a bat weight, the swing generates greater force in anticipation of a heavier load without affecting swing mechanics.

Studies have shown that a bat moving 65 miles per hour that makes contact with a 60 mile per hour pitch can drive the baseball 400 feet. The same pitch hit by a swing that is 5 mph faster will result in a hit that sails approximately 25 feet farther can be the difference between an outfield fly and an out-of-the-park home run.

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The goal is for the bat to make good contact with the ball while moving as fast as possible. Yes, using a heavier bat and swinging it at the same speed can also increase momentum, however; there are a few reasons why adding mass rather than velocity is less effective:

1) As bat weight increases a hitter will get to a point where he/she can no longer swing at the same speed and the extra mass does not equate to additional momentum. If bat speed falls enough, momentum will actually decrease.

2) It is possible for a hitter’s swing to change as the weight of the bat increases. If a weighted swing changes a hitter’s mechanics there is essentially no transfer of power.

A better alternative for any hitter who would like to learn how to increase bat speed, is to do so by engaging in sport specific strength training that combines the hitter’s own swing dynamics with resistance which can be accomplished with one tool – The Hand Speed Trainer weighted sleeves.

Velocity x Mass = Momentum.

We now know that momentum involves kinetic links that build force, and a bat swing has 7 to 12 links in its chain. Hand Speed Trainer works by putting functional resistance, in ounces, toward the end of this chain between the hitter’s elbow and the wrist. Since the resistance is added inside the kinetic chain and not an external modality like a bat weight, the swing generates greater force in anticipation of a heavier load without affecting swing mechanics.

BAT SPEED RESULTS

A simple test was conducted to illustrate effectiveness of our weighted training aids, which can easily be duplicated to measure personal results for any hitter.

  1. A warmed up batter hits 5 balls off of a pitching machine
  2. The batter puts on the Hand Speed Trainer with the lowest weight option (4 oz) added to each arm and hits 10 balls off of the pitching machine.
  3. HST weighted sleeves are removed and the batter hits 5 additional balls.

Bat Speed to Impact, Hand Speed, Time to Impact, Bat Vertical Angle, and Attack Angle are measured using the Zepp Baseball Swing Analysis for each swing. Results revealed that the second set of 5 balls hit had an average Bat Speed to Impact increase of 3 mph without a change to the mechanics data.

With repeated use it’s easy to see how increasing bat speed and ultimately greater power at the plate can be achieved by incorporating HST into any baseball player’s practice regimen.

 

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